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This is the "Intro to Creative Commons" page of the "Creative Commons Basics" guide.
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Creative Commons Basics  

Last Updated: Apr 16, 2014 URL: http://uncg.libguides.com/creativecommons Print Guide RSS Updates
Intro to Creative Commons Print Page
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Copyright

Key facts about copyright related to CC

  • Copyright occurs automatically with the creation of a creative work and lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years.
  • Copyright is a bundle of rights.
  • Almost everything is copyrighted whether or not the author intends to keep all of those rights.

Find out more about Copyright!

 

Examples of CC work

 

Poll

Have you ever used creative commons licensed material in your work?





 

Workshop Information

 Watch the RECORDED SESSION of our 10/2010 online workshop Intro to Creative Commons

AGENDA:

  • What is Creative Commons
  • Key facts about copyright
  • CC Licenses
  • Examples of Using CC 
  • Searching for CC materials

PRESENTERS:

Lynda Kellam McMillan &

Beth Filar Williams

     

    Attribution

    Material adapted from Kleinman, M. (2008, November). The beauty of 'Some Rights Reserved': Introducing Creative Commons to librarians, faculty, and students." College and Research Libraries News, 69 (10): 594-597.

     

    Get Creative Video

     

    Searching for CC materials

    See also:

    • Internet Archive Library - trade-friendly artists, strictly non-commercial, has options for video, music, audio and text!
    • UNCG Archives resources -  this digital collection includes photographs, documents, textiles, artifacts, and other records of UNCG materials from the archives.
     

    CC Licenses

    License Conditions

    Creators choose a set of conditions they wish to apply to their work.



    Attribution 
    CC BY

    This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

    View License Deed | View Legal Code

    Attribution-ShareAlike
    CC BY-SA

    This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

    View License Deed | View Legal Code

    Attribution-NoDerivs

    CC BY-N

    D This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

    View License Deed | View Legal Code

    Attribution-NonCommercial

    CC BY-NC

    This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

    View License Deed | View Legal Code

    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

    CC BY-NC-SA

    This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

    View License Deed |View Legal Code

    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDeriv

    s CC BY-NC-ND

    This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

    View License Deed | View Legal Code

     

    Resources

    Creative Commons website

    What is Creative Commons: Wanna Work Together (video)

     Interview with Professor Lessing on Creative Commons (8 min video)

     7 Things You Should Know About Creative Commons (from EDUCAUSE)

    Kleinman, M. (2008). The Beauty of "Some Rights Reserved."  C&RL News, 69(10),594-7

    Korn, N., & Oppenheim, C. (2006). Creative Commons Licenses in Higher and Further Education: Do We Care? Adriadne, (49).

    Wherry, Timothy. (2007). Intellectual Property: Everything the Digital-Age Librarian Needs to Know. Chicago: ALA Editions.

    Notess, G. (2009). Finding Free Media. Online, 33(1), 41-3.

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